Be sure to use only gentle pressure when massaging breast tissue to prevent further inflammation or trauma.

Engorgement Instructions

Before breastfeeding or pumping:  

Step 1: Heat Lactamo by submerging it in a cup of hot water for 3 minutes (Note: this can be as hot as desired depending on need, ranging from luke warm to boiling) OR placing it in a conventional steam steriliser for one cycle.

Roll it between your palms for 10 seconds to make sure it’s not too hot.  

Note: Do not put Lactamo in a microwave.  

Step 2: Roll Lactamo down your breastbone (the middle of your chest) 4 - 6 times.   

Gently stimulating the chest area may encourage the flow of lymphatic fluid back to the bloodstream.    

Step 3: Roll Lactamo under your armpit in a circular motion 4 - 6 times. Repeat this step if you like.    

You have multiple lymph nodes in your armpits. Massaging this area may stimulate lymph flow and help drain swelling in your breast tissue.   

Step 4: Roll Lactamo over your breast in an upward motion towards your armpit. 

This may help drain the extra fluid in your breast, reducing swelling and inflammation that can cause the feeling of engorgement.   

Before and/or during breastfeeding or pumping:  

Step 5: Roll your heated Lactamo over your breast towards your nipple for a few minutes, taking care to remain focused on the quality of your baby’s feeding and not disrupt their attachment to your nipple.    

Keep the pressure very gentle.  

Gentle breast massage during feeding or pumping may prompt your let-down reflex and aid milk flow.   

After or between breastfeeding or pumping:   

Step 6: You might like to gently place a cooled Lactamo on your breast to soothe and help reduce the inflammation and associated pain/discomfort.  

Avoid compression or massage at this stage. 

ENGORGEMENT

Many mamas experience sore breasts during their breastfeeding or pumping journey. Overly full, tight, and painful breasts are a sign of engorgement.

What is engorgement? 

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine reports that more than two-thirds of mamas experience symptoms of breast engorgement, including tenderness, in the first five days after birth. While engorgement is especially common in the first week or two after birth, it can happen at any time. Many, if not most, mamas experience it at some stage during their breastfeeding journey.

It can happen in any part of your breast, including under your armpit. It’s often super uncomfortable (even painful) and your breasts may feel warm and heavy. If you’re experiencing engorgement, know that you’re not alone.

Feeding your baby often and making sure they are feeding well are two of the best ways to prevent and ease engorgement.  

Reliable, trusted sources such as the Australian Breastfeeding Association and the Australian Government parenting website raisingchildren.net.au agree that temperature (warmth and gentle massage before and during a feed, and cool or cold after) can help alleviate the pain and discomfort of breast engorgement.  

This is where Lactamo can help. Gently applying a warmed Lactamo to your breasts before and during a feed or a pump can encourage your let-down and help your milk flow, which aids with thorough breast drainage. Midwife and nurse Monique Maitland agrees. “Lactamo is a great tool for that because warming the Lactamo ball up at the start and massaging your breast to try to get the milk flowing can make it a little bit easier for your baby to start to drain the breast.” 

Using Lactamo for engorgement

How to use Lactamo for engorgement in six easy steps

Step 1

Heat Lactamo by submerging it in a cup of hot water for 3 minutes (Note: this can be as hot as desired depending on need, ranging from luke warm to boiling) OR placing it in a conventional steam steriliser for one cycle.

Roll it between your palms for 10 seconds to make sure it’s not too hot.  

Note: Do not put Lactamo in a microwave.  

Step 2

Roll Lactamo down your breastbone (the middle of your chest) 4 - 6 times.   

Gently stimulating the chest area may encourage the flow of lymphatic fluid back to the bloodstream.    

Step 3

Roll Lactamo under your armpit in a circular motion 4 - 6 times. Repeat this step if you like.    

You have multiple lymph nodes in your armpits. Massaging this area may stimulate lymph flow and help drain swelling in your breast tissue.   

Step 4

Roll Lactamo over your breast in an upward motion towards your armpit. 

This may help drain the extra fluid in your breast, reducing swelling and inflammation that can cause the feeling of engorgement.   

Step 5

Before and/or during breastfeeding or pumping

Roll your heated Lactamo over your breast towards your nipple for a few minutes, taking care to remain focused on the quality of your baby’s feeding and not disrupt their attachment to your nipple. 

Keep the pressure very gentle.  

Gentle breast massage during feeding or pumping may prompt your let-down reflex and aid milk flow.   

Experts also recommend cooling your breasts after a feed or a pump to relieve the pain, inflammation and swelling that comes with breast engorgement. No need to break out the frozen peas or the chilled cabbage leaves – a cooled Lactamo will do the trick. Monique says, “if your breasts are still feeling quite tender after the feed, by applying a cooled Lactamo, you've got that soothing feeling.”

STep 6

Using Lactamo after or between breastfeeding or pumping

You might like to gently place a cooled Lactamo on your breast to soothe and help reduce the inflammation and associated pain/discomfort.  

Avoid compression or massage at this stage.

FAQ

Engorgement happens when milk, blood and other fluids build up in the breast, leading to that oh-so-uncomfortable too-full, rock-hard, sore breasts feeling.  

Many mamas experience engorgement when their milk first comes in around two to six days after birth when you, your body and your baby are still finding your breastfeeding rhythm. It can happen if your baby is struggling with feeding or attaching to the breast (or simply still figuring out how to do it) and your breasts aren’t being drained well during a feed. It can also happen if your body makes more milk than your baby needs (known as breastmilk oversupply), but this is less common. 

But engorgement isn’t limited to the early days of breastfeeding. You might experience it later down the track if your baby misses a feed or you skip a pumping session. Many mamas wake up with sore, engorged breasts when their baby sleeps for longer, if they have a longer-than-usual gap between feeds, or if their baby feeds for a shorter time. Weaning quickly can lead to engorgement, too.

Yes, breast engorgement is a common experience for many breastfeeding mothers. Engorgement can occur when breasts are not emptied on a regular and frequent basis. This condition often arises between 2 to 5 days after birth or during any period of altered breastfeeding or pumping routines. An increase in milk volume or an ineffective latch by the baby that doesn't adequately empty the breast. It’s essential to address engorgement promptly to ensure comfort and maintain a healthy milk supply.

While both involve breast discomfort, they are not the same. A blocked milk duct occurs when milk flow is obstructed in a specific area, leading to pain and inflammation. Engorgement, on the other hand, is generalized swelling and fullness of the breast. 

While engorgement primarily affects the breasts, it can sometimes lead to systemic symptoms like nausea, especially if it's severe or prolonged.

Engorgement itself doesn't typically cause a fever. However, if engorgement leads to an infection like mastitis, a fever can be one of the symptoms. It's crucial to differentiate between the two and seek medical attention if a fever develops.

Traditionally, applying cabbage leaves to the breasts has been a popular method to alleviate engorgement. While diet alone cannot prevent engorgement, incorporating specific foods and herbs can enhance lactation and safeguard against infections linked to engorgement. Consuming a diet abundant in Vitamin C-rich fruits and probiotics, such as yogurt, is essential in combating internal infections. Staying well-hydrated is crucial as it aids in flushing toxins from the body, thereby minimizing the risk of infections associated with engorgement.

Engorgement can be a precursor to mastitis, especially if not addressed promptly. Mastitis is an infection of the breast tissue that results in breast pain, swelling, and other symptoms. 

Engorgement typically lasts for 1-5 days postpartum but can vary among mothers. With proper breastfeeding techniques and gentle massage, the discomfort usually subsides as the body adjusts its milk production.

While mild engorgement might resolve on its own, it's essential to address the condition to prevent complications like blocked ducts or mastitis. Techniques like massaging with a gently warmed lactamo before and during feeds alongside applying a cooled lactamo after feeds. This can aid in milk drainage and inflammation reduction. 

Yes, it's possible for one breast to become engorged while the other remains unaffected. This can result from the baby favouring one side or uneven milk production. It's essential to ensure both breasts are emptied adequately during feedings.